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Patriots Day

SOCIAL STUDIES

As the events of the American Revolution unfold, students immerse themselves in the world of the 18th century Patriots using a textbook, audio and video, journals written by children of the time, other primary sources, and a variety of hands-on teaching objects

Students create and develop an 18th Century persona.

They speak and write in the language of the time.

They live according to a code based on self-respect, respect for others, and self-control.

They wrestle with serious issues and societal inequalities in historical context.

They master Enlightenment principle-based methods of reasoning to make decisions, solve problems, and debate elements of the United States Constitution and Bill of Rights.

They study the actions of people of the time from all walks of life to discern character traits they admire and discover role models.

Child In Costume
Child In Costume
Child In Costume
Child In Costume

Students create and develop an 18th Century persona.

They speak and write in the language of the time.

They live according to a code based on self-respect, respect for others, and self-control.

They wrestle with serious issues and societal inequalities in historical context.

They master Enlightenment principle-based methods of reasoning to make decisions, solve problems, and debate elements of the United States Constitution and Bill of Rights.

They study the actions of people of the time from all walks of life to discern character traits they admire and discover role models.

The Why America Is Free Textbook

Why America Is Free covers the period from approximately 1753 to 1810.  Students will have already studied Native American societies of North America in the 14th-18th centuries, early explorers, the early colonial period, and slavery in the American colonies.  Building on this knowledge, Why America Is Free focuses on the ideas, issues, events, peoples, and impact of the American Revolution domestically and worldwide. Both accurate and designed to be uniquely interesting to upper-elementary students, it is a valuable classroom resource.

The lesson plans work with the textbook and also increase the attention given to minorities and the diverse perspectives necessary in American schools.

One key to success of the textbook is the inclusion of the personal story of a fictional boy, which makes the events real and accessible.

Why America Is Free Cover

Students first meet him when he is a little older than they are.

He reappears as he grows to young manhood in the midst of rising conflict with England.

They see him again during the war years.

They see him last when he is a father with children their age, riding off to participate in the Constitution Convention.

As interesting as the textbook is, it is greatly expanded upon by the other more active aspects of the curriculum.

Among the many ways the curriculum goes beyond the book, its lessons include multiple perspectives, increasing the attention given to diverse groups involved in and affected by the war. These inclusive additions meet school requirements as they increase interest and understanding.

Examples of lesson elements that include diverse people and perspectives

Insertion and Removal of Slavery from the Declaration

Abolition

George Washington’s Manumission of Slaves

Patriot Indian Alliances/British Indian Alliances

Women’s Role Limitation and Expansion during the American Revolution

Integration in the Continental Army

Black Loyalists/Black Patriots

Loyalist Perspectives

Seeking Neutrality: Ohio Shawnees, Delawares, and Moravians

Women soldiers: Deborah Sampson, Catherine Moore Barry, Others

Published by The Society of the Cincinnati in cooperation with the Mount Vernon Ladies Association, 1998.

As part of the curriculum, principles like honesty, civic duty, and respect are ingrained in the class experience. As students enter middle school, they have a keen understanding of the discipline and manners expected of Americans as our nation was founded. The self-discipline taught in the curriculum is manifested in improved behavior throughout the middle school grades.”

—Middle School – Social Studies Instructional Coach and Head of Department – Public School

Surrender

Book of Heroes, A Gift from Our History

As students come across people from our nation’s past, they try to discern the principles that motivated their decisions and actions and create a Book of Heroes with the diverse people whose character they admire. Students:

  • Collect and analyze the actions and decisions of people from our nation’s past to discover the principles that guide people of great character.
  • Find worthy role models whose examples can help guide their own decision-making and problem-solving.
  • Develop a unifying awareness of a shared national legacy of extraordinary men, women and children in whom they can all take pride.